A wood and concrete brutalist exterior shields this 2900 square foot home design, based in Houston, United States. Created by the architects at Robertson Design, The Concrete Box house conceals a two-story home with a multi-level living space. The ground floor is a brutalist concrete backed room with a distinctly cosy essence that comes from high-end upholstered furniture, attractive wood-clad elements and a functional kitchen placed right at the heart of the home. Private courtyards and a large garden surround the cool concrete interior with beautiful landscaped views. Upstairs, the house is revealed to be a family home, with two kids’ rooms and a serene master suite.

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A modern brutalist exterior blankly encases this exquisitely detailed Japanese home, expertly designed by Apollo Architects & Associates. The 410 square metre property is located in a quiet suburban neighbourhood in the densely populated Kanto region. The homeowners acquired this tiered and irregularly shaped lot with meaningful family time in mind. The owners wished to incorporate courtyards as a part of their home life together, and so the design began to take shape within the challenging topography. The distinctive outdoor environment expands the living space in complete privacy. The home interior carries a contemporary ranch-style aesthetic which fashions a comfortable lounge and dining room combo, and a closed, glass wall kitchen.

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This amazing 640 square metre lakeside guesthouse is a brutalist masterpiece by architects Nikken Sekkei, located in Japan. The concrete house was designed to unfold as a continuous spiral that would reveal more of the changing lakeside view with each step taken. It’s not only the magnificent view that envelops this lake house, but the blissful sound of the rippling water’s edge right up against the home’s deck. Humidity and thermal radiation are carried into the spiral in varying degrees, so that guests can discover atmospheres they find most comfortable. Wide-open panoramas of garden touch interior spaces to build deep connection with nature in all of the guesthouse’s unique living areas.

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Brutalist architecture has come a long way since its original peak back in the late 1950s to 60s. Back then, institutional buildings and social housing projects projected a cold and austere nature that became associated with totalitarianism by the late 1970s, and so fell out of favour. Now we’re seeing an exciting comeback of reinforced concrete and steel exteriors, cast in modular volumes to build great hulking triumphs and unique private residences. Brutalism (coined from a play on the French ‘béton brut’, meaning ‘raw concrete’) is graphic, geometric, and toys with the negative space, all of which make it incredibly appealing to the minimalist mindset of today.

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