Abstract, linear volumes stack to form a crisp modern 4266 square foot home for a family of five in Bangalore, India. Created by Crest Architects, the unique angular form stands out sharply against a grey, densely populated metropolis. Clean white concrete and rich wood cladding encase a dwelling based upon the ancient architectural science of Vaastu, which embraces the benefits of nature. The interior spaces are simple, spacious and designed around two landscaped courtyards, each with skylights that flood sunlight into the openly interconnected floors of the house. The natural greenery brings a valuable piece of the outdoors inside of the introverted city abode, with trees that draw the eye upward through the impressive void.

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This unconventional apartment design, situated high above the city of Kyiv, Ukraine, features large family oriented spaces that serve multiple functions. Designed by HD m2, each of the two reception rooms contain creative all doing layouts, where family members can come together and hang out, whilst engaging in different activities. We’ll take a look at an open plan kitchen diner and lounge combination that contains a relaxing day bed and hammock window nook, and a separate formal dining room that’s lined with a long laid-back sofa. We’ll keep to the open concept in a master bedroom that melds fully with its ensuite, and a cool kids’ room with a net play loft.

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In the very center of Chelyabinsk, Russia, just a few minutes from Revolution Square, we visit a polished city apartment in the desirable Freedom Tower complex. Visualised by Anova Interior Design, this 114 square metre concept explores a high contrast decor scheme. Light frothy champagne tones are challenged by darker tonal elements that bring warmth and maturity. Modern lighting takes on a huge role within the polished contemporary scheme, creating a magical glow that builds an atmosphere of anticipation. Sleek yet uber comfortable modern furniture adds layer upon layer of luxe throughout the apartment, fashioning a welcoming haven away from the speed of the city.

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A study in contrasts, Carmel Greer’s new DC home boldly blurs the lines between tradition and modernism

At least since Thomas Jefferson built Monticello, American architects have used their own homes as testing grounds for various design philosophies. So it comes as no surprise that Carmel Greer—an architect with an equal passion for interiors—would try out ideas while building a house for her family. Make that plural: A decade out of school, she’s on to her second residence in Washington’s Kent neighborhood.

One day in early May, Greer is home from her studio at District Design, leading a Zoom tour to comply with covid-19 restrictions. She opens sleek, black-painted mahogany doors to an airy white foyer furnished with a Korean chest, a gift from bosses at her first architecture firm. The staircase is understated, even as it floats overhead to a third floor. “I didn’t want the house to be

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The modern makeover of an historic Georgetown row house respects its architectural past

Traversing the streets of Georgetown, even harried passersby can’t help but pause to admire the neighborhood’s charming homes. Row houses steeped in period detail harken back centuries. But today, there’s no telling what awaits behind those quaint façades. While district regulations protect exteriors, many Georgetowners take their interiors in entirely new directions.

Consider, for example, the new owners of an historic 1820 row house. The couple with three grown children decided to leave their long-time residence in DC’s Wesley Heights in favor of Georgetown, where they could walk to restaurants, movies and the riverfront. Avid art collectors, they were drawn to the Federal-style home’s generous proportions. “The high ceilings and great wall expanses created space for larger-scale art that we never had before,” explains the husband, a real estate executive.

But the property also presented conundrums. The

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